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PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2022 11:43 pm 
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For the record, I like that I might use that again, Uber is good for the trade in the sense that a lot of companies private hire are having to compete with them for drivers and that means giving more money to the drivers, in my opinion , But as for the vulnerable person coming home in the early hours having drunk a little too much of the sweet nectar or even beer then that is questionable, but the professional taxi driver would make sure they got home, But as for charging six times the normal amount I don't think so but then that's just me #-o

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 12:37 am 
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grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
unless the bar specifically charges the drunk lady over and above their usual prices.


You do know that it is illegal to actually serve alcohol to a person who is already drunk.


If the bar staff know for certain the customer is heavily intoxicated then you would assume most would have the responsibility to not serve the customer. If some did for any price then it would be bad business practice.

However, in general I think all drinking establishments sell alcohol to drunk customers all the time.

It's just a case of how drunk each customer is and where do you draw the line. It's a subjective/grey area.


Most would be out of business if they adhered to a very strict policy of not serving alcohol to anyone they assume has had too much and therefore classified as drunk.

Ah, so because they all do it that makes it ok then in your eyes. It is still illegal.


I am much in favour of common sense as opposed to religiously following any particular law. It is illegal to go over the speed limit but how many cab drivers break that law on any given day?

My outlook is as long as you don't cause injury, harm or loss to anyone then it is nobodies business what law you may break or not. That seems like a good social code to go by if we apply rational thought to the matter.

Public houses and serving alcoholic drinks is obviously a fine line because beyond a certain point the establishment could cause harm by serving one drink too many to a customer.

They do have a social responsibility like any other business and they are trusted by the public to be responsible but it is not black and white like anything else in this world. Grown adults are choosing of their own free will to drink and use the establishment.

So where do you draw the line and what is the standard for determining if someone is drunk or not?


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 12:47 am 
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StuartW wrote:
RTD wrote:
Also, I must state that in my posts I was generally referring to Private Hire and not Hackney Carriage.

Funny that, was drafting a post on the rank last night pointing out that you'd posted several thousand words about 'taxis', but without clarifying whether you meant HC, PH or both :)

So thanks for the clarification (got a run to Dundee late last night, which saved my shift, but it meant I never got back to the draft...).

Quote:
They are two different markets. I don't see the future of the Hackney Trade thriving going forward. It might do well in London and perhaps a few other major cities but that business model is almost obsolete in comparison to the technological advancement of the PH trade.

In some regards they're two different markets, but not in others. In London, most obviously, price competition from Uber has been a bone of contention from the London HC trade for years, and has obviously lost them work. Of course, nothing new about competition from the minicab trade in the capital, but this has been accelerated by Uber's marketing and the convenience of app booking etc. No need to go into the details of the latter, obviously, but suffice to say that the HC and PH markets are in competition for the same market, so there's not really a strict dichotomy between the two.

Of course, the HC/PH divide is probably more distinct in London than in the rest of the UK, where there's often little distinction between the two, and they merge into a sort of hybrid trade, particularly in smaller towns. For example, we've got 100+ HCs in East Fife, with no real PH sector, except for those attached to predominantly HD despatch offices, or those offering more specialist services such as golf tours and airport transfers.

And there are mixed HC/PH fleets in some cities as well, like Dundee and Aberdeen, where PHVs use taximeters and charge the council HC tariff. Ditto the likes of Brighton, as far as I know.

So London is perhaps one extreme, and locations at the other extreme are HC dominated (or in more rural locations, perhaps PH-only). But to say HC and PH are two different markets is surely an oversimplification.

Quote:
Lastly, in relation to offering hard data.

Please find below links to news stories on the topic. If you simply do a search on Google of taxi driver shortages you will find a plethora of stories relating to it. These links contain reports by Councils, company owners and drivers alike up and down the country so in no way does this show a one sided view in a specific corner of the country.

Please note in the Guardian article it states that according to The Department for Transport the decline in licensed drivers accross the country in the year upto June 2021 was 6% and the licensed vehicle decline was 16%. It's clear to me there are still many licensed drivers out there who have just left the trade with no intention of returning.

Well indeed, the 6% reduction in drivers seems to be about as hard as the data gets, and is totally inconsistent with the nonsense spouted by the LPHCA and others. And 6% doesn't seem a particularly significant number, especially in view of the uncharted territory of the post-pandemic market. In one year the number of HCs in my gaff once increased 50% :-o

And, for example, the operator in Newcastle who recently said he had 500 drivers left after lockdown, so needed another 500. He managed to recruit 120 (as I recall it), but then was back with more recruitment advertorial in the press saying he still needed 500 :lol:

Yes, I need to win £10million on the Euromillions :roll:

And thanks for the links, but pretty sure all those articles have been posted on here and dissected, which is why many of us take the stats which a huge pinch of salt 8-[


I do use taxis and cabs interchangeably without distinction to be fair.

I must of forgot and should of realised I was on a taxi drivers forum and was bound to be called out on it so I should of chosen what I said carefully. I use the word taxi a lot when I am specifically referring to PH so I should try to avoid that bad habit.

Both markets obviously differ from place to place depending on the size of the area in question and the council's own unique policies etc. Some towns are purely Hackney and others purely PH and others with a mixture of both and the pricing structures are all over the place up and down the country due to the complexities of local areas such as population dynamics and the cost of living, average local wage and local house prices and the quantity of licensed drivers etc.

It is a bit of a melting pot and can be very confusing for non taxi (there I go again) trade people to understand the distinctions.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 1:04 am 
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Sussex wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
MR T wrote:
Quote:
n relation to regulation, my stance is there should be no regulation


Let Chaos Rule :shock: :shock:


Not sure it would be chaos.

But I'm sure the politicians will tell you that.

I think it would be chaos for those of us wishing to earn a good living.

If I was to guess I would say the best paid cab drivers in the UK work in London. It's not pure coincidence that they have the hardest entry criteria.


Not sure. A very complex issue with many factors to consider.

Assuming the cab drivers live in London the cost of living is ridiculously high (I certainly would not want to live there). House prices are absurd to buy and to rent.

If they are Hackney in London there are the new requirements for electric taxis which to me seem extortionate. £65,000 + for the best range and better quality LEVC. That's a huge expense. Then there are the congestion charges. The London Mayor or Transport For London are doing their very best to make that more and more costly (obviously does not apply to electric vehicles; YET).

I made fairly good earnings when I started out over 9 years ago in the South West in a rural area. Had to put a few hours in though as I am sure you can imagine. You don't make good money in this industry from working 30 hours a week.

Started out with a vehicle over 10 years old which was my personal car before I got licensed and used that for a couple of years.

If you are lucky enough to start in an area where the council vehicle requirements are not strict on age, emissions and appearance then you could be in a healthy position.

However, from what I can tell the councils are doing their best at creating barriers to entry by mandating ridiculous things such as livery and age restrictions on the vehicles. I see more cities are introducing congestion charges.

I think I read that in Birmingham the licensed drivers were protesting the recent implementation and complaining that they were barely making minimum wage as it was so the councils seem to be well on their way to driving more drivers out of the business.

Their arrogance and ignorance astounds me. It really does.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 1:14 am 
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Sussex wrote:
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If Uber quote a price of £60 and the customer accepts that price whether she or he is drunk or not is completely irrelevant.

So you are saying a contract entered into when one side is pi**ed, will stand up to legal scrutiny?

Another view I don't share with you.


How does Uber know if any of their customers are drunk or not when they book a cab via their app?

They don't. All customers whether they are drunk or not have to log in to the app and book their cab.

Uber have no way of knowing what condition any of their customers are in.

What are you suggesting they do to eradicate this?

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 2:02 am 
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StuartW wrote:
Drafted half this last night, and have kind of lost the thread a bit, and can't really recall all the stuff I intended posting. And can't be bothered going back over RTD's voluminous posts to cover everything, but this is just a few thoughts about surge-pricing and its applicability to the trade etc.


RTD wrote:
There is an argument that Uber does price gouge. But again this is down to supply and demand.

If they had enough drivers on the road the prices would not increase significantly. It's required to meet demand.

If enough drivers get on the road the price decreases and an equilibrium is met.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what they call neoclassical economics?

But the other side of the market clearing/equilibrium model is that customers are paying significantly higher, and at times huge multiples would be required to balance supply and demand.

Which is why I think your preferred model simply isn't going to happen anytime soon - the chances of regulators deregulating hackney carriage fares in the near future are less than zero, in my opinion, because early hours undersupply is going to get worse in the short- to medium-term, I suspect, which is when the women's safety stuff and suchlike comes into play, so policy makers simply aren't going to let it rip anytime in the near future.

Ditto regulation more generally, and although I think some of the ULEZ and CAZ stuff is well over the top, and obviously happening at the worst possible time, the chance of any major reversal in that regards seems limited (although I suspect there will be a stay of execution for many until the wreckage of the pandemic becomes a bit clearer).

Which in turn raises another big question in relation to your several thousand words about the 'taxi' industry. Do you mean hackney carriages, private hire, or both?

But as regards your promotion of a surge-pricing model, it's perhaps worth pointing out that (I think) all 350+ UK councils have different HC tariffs for unsocial hours, and some have them for weekends and 'party' tariffs applying after midnight (say), and on public holidays. And all have them over the festive period, as far as I know.

So that's a form of surge-pricing, although very crude, obviously, and certainly not dynamic in the sense of Uber's.

But there is an element of dynamism in even HC fare-setting in that discounting is commonplace in some areas. Which of course is the opposite of the dynamic, market-clearing surge-pricing approach you're advocating, but to a degree it's just the market introducing a bit of price-flexibility where council-regulated HC tariffs are set above what might be called the market equilibrium rate.

But in turn that maybe points towards the competitive nature of the market, at least in some areas, but which perhaps indicates the limited applicability of surge-pricing, and why other firms haven't adopted it, at least to the extent that Uber has (of course, historically the technology simply hasn't been available to support a fully dymanic Uber-style pricing model). And, of course, a crude surge-price model in the form of unsocial hours premiums etc has effectively been the norm for years, as mentioned above.

But at least one major provincial operator recently trialled surge-pricing, but gave up fairly quickly because of customer complaints. But didn't Boro Cars introduce a fixed surcharge at busy times which customers could use to effectively jump the queue and get priorty service? Again, that's not surge-pricing, but is a further refinement on the unsocial hours premiums.

But to be honest I find it difficult to get my head round Uber's surge-pricing model and how that works in terms of customer loyalty etc. But I suppose a small proportion of customers are largely price-insensitive, and will pay the price simply to secure a care immediately when they can't get one elsewhere. And while Uber may take a hit in that regard as regards customer loyalty, maybe they just think that's a price worth paying (pardon pun), while on the other hand, as a major brand they know that they can at times charge a premium price and get away with it.

But maybe the surge-price model not so easy for the more traditional providers, even assuming they have the software in place to handle dynamic pricing. Another constraint may be that traditional PH providers are competing with HCs, which obviously can't surge-price beyond the regulated tariff, whether on the ranks, or on circuits.

Moreso when PH and HCs are working on the same circuit - they can't have PH surge-pricing while HCs doing the same pre-booked work are constrained by the council-regulated tariffs.

As for airlines and the like, it's of course worth pointing out the existence of the Ryanairs and EasyJets of this world, which while are no doubt good models in terms of dynamic pricing, aren't really compatible with premium pricing per se.

And, of course, the history of the airline industry hardly demonstrates an object lesson in stability and consistency, so there's maybe a lesson of sorts there.

But, who knows, there may be a place for more dynamic pricing in the future trades, with Uber blazing the trail, and helped along by the adoption of the relevant technology.

But in the meantime I tend to think of pricing in the trades more in terms of something like restaurants, which may charge more at Christmas time, say, but their pricing isn't really dynamic in the Uber sense.


You are as bad as me with the thousand words. :D I am referring to PH as opposed to HC.

The terms used for the different economic models over the decades and centuries get changed and the meanings reversed so leads to a lot of confusion.

I keep it simple by stating there are two distinct models. Free market capitalism and the other is government interference.

Generally, the more the government/authorities intervene the worse they make things.

The free market always takes care of itself. It's not a perfect system (we are human after all) but it is the best system we have as opposed to all other economic systems which without exception have all failed from communism to fascism to socialism etc.

Obviously we have had neither of those nasty systems (at least since the industrial revolution) in our highly civilised nation but we are well on the way if things don't get reversed.

Basically the more the government intervenes in markets the closer we get to socialism or communism or whatever.

Intelligent thoughts you make on these matters and yes there is probably no chance of any deregulation on the horizon. I am under no illusions. The councils arrogance and ignorance is astounding.

But they will start to backtrack sooner or later. Their policies will backfire. More drivers will leave in droves due to their congestion charges and newer vehicle requirements etc.

They seem to think taxi drivers are making out like bandits so their thought process is they will sit there and absorb all these costs.

I will say this. All this regulation is just going to make the taxis more expensive for the public. The costs will be passed on eventually to them by the drivers. Some will pass them on immediately but a lot won't.

You are correct in stating that there are some attempts by the councils in setting peak time higher fares up and down the country via their tariffs. It's nowhere close to where it would be if operators/drivers did this on their own accord in their own local area of operation.

The customers are going to complain like hell against any firm that introduces surge pricing. I didn't say it was going to be easy. The story you say of a firm recently trying it and then getting scared does not surprise me. It will take a lot of courage and thick skin to get through it and be persistent. It will involve a lot of trial and error. But it will work.

In relation to getting your head around how Uber seem to manage customer loyalty with their surge pricing. I don't know with any certainty but I think their customers are aware/knowledgeable now that Uber will charge more at peak times ie Saturday nights etc.

Customers just accept it now because they have been doing it for a long time since their inception. That's why the rest of the trade will manage if they change and stick with it. There is no such thing as loyalty in business, anyway. In a free market no one company will have all the business even if they are the cheapest company around. It's impossible. That's why a lot of firms can change their models successfully.

They will probably have their regular customers during the week that use them for going to work and other journeys and their younger sociable crowd that party and go out on weekends who are used to their surge pricing week in week out.

They will also have customers who adapt to their model and avoid using them at peak times and use them at other times. They probably use all the independent PH firms at peak times who are stupid enough to take them home for less than half the price Uber does and then use Uber off peak. It all balances out.

You make an important point with the airlines by highlighting the budget companies such as Ryanair. There will always be competition in any market that will offer a cheaper service. I am not saying all taxi firms should use surge pricing. But most should. There is always going to be budget firms going around like idiots for peanuts. There are niche positions in most industries. It's human nature.

Please note that a lot of airlines if not all make their profits predominantly from business class/first class customers who are charged a premium over standard customers.

The business class customers basically subsidise the economy class. The airlines barely make any profit from the majority of standard customers on each and every flight.

This is what I am suggesting for the taxi business. Charge significantly higher prices on Saturday nights from 6pm til 4am (just an example) and rush hours on weekdays where demand outstrips supply and charge a lot less for customers during the week at normal or off peak times. Peak customers subsidise off peak customers.

The pricing structure will vary from place to place based on many factors but that is the general idea and it can be implemented successfully.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 2:25 am 
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Quote:
This is what I am suggesting for the taxi business. Charge significantly higher prices on Saturday nights from 6pm til 4am (just an example) and rush hours on weekdays where demand outstrips supply and charge a lot less for customers during the week at normal or off peak times. Peak customers subsidise off peak customers.

The pricing structure will vary from place to place based on many factors but that is the general idea and it can be implemented successfully.

Already in place

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 4:10 am 
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MR T wrote:
Quote:
This is what I am suggesting for the taxi business. Charge significantly higher prices on Saturday nights from 6pm til 4am (just an example) and rush hours on weekdays where demand outstrips supply and charge a lot less for customers during the week at normal or off peak times. Peak customers subsidise off peak customers.

The pricing structure will vary from place to place based on many factors but that is the general idea and it can be implemented successfully.

Already in place


Not to the level it needs to be.

Let me give an example.

Assuming your average taxi firm charges £5 starting fare and £2 per mile at normal times.

At peak times (saturday evening/night) charge £10 starting fare and £4 per mile.

Obviously, depending on the area it could be more or slightly less depending on different factors.

Fixed fares should also be totally eliminated at all times.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 5:45 am 
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Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

That is what we do. Even if we have a booking, if the passenger is, in the drivers opinion, to drunk to be carried safely, we refuse them. it is not the drivers job to clean up the puke that these people invariably leave behind.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 12:28 pm 
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grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

That is what we do. Even if we have a booking, if the passenger is, in the drivers opinion, to drunk to be carried safely, we refuse them. it is not the drivers job to clean up the puke that these people invariably leave behind.


To be fair, that is a policy I had too.

It's their own problem for being irresponsible with their own actions.

I suppose Uber could put a disclaimer in their app upon booking a fare that states "All riders with Uber reserve the right to refuse any customer should the rider deem them heavily intoxicated or violent upon pick-up".

Shouldn't be a difficult policy to implement.

It's at the driver's discretion then.

Perhaps a Judge may rule in the customer's favour in relation to contract law regarding taking a fare with someone who is heavily intoxicated.

It's possible the driver might be seen as irresponsible for taking the customer as they were not in control of their mental faculties.

But I don't think it would be a simple case unless they were witnesses involved.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 1:10 pm 
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Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

That is what we do. Even if we have a booking, if the passenger is, in the drivers opinion, to drunk to be carried safely, we refuse them. it is not the drivers job to clean up the puke that these people invariably leave behind.


To be fair, that is a policy I had too.

It's their own problem for being irresponsible with their own actions.

I suppose Uber could put a disclaimer in their app upon booking a fare that states "All riders with Uber reserve the right to refuse any customer should the rider deem them heavily intoxicated or violent upon pick-up".

Shouldn't be a difficult policy to implement.

It's at the driver's discretion then.

Perhaps a Judge may rule in the customer's favour in relation to contract law regarding taking a fare with someone who is heavily intoxicated.

It's possible the driver might be seen as irresponsible for taking the customer as they were not in control of their mental faculties.

But I don't think it would be a simple case unless they were witnesses involved.

There were witnesses involved last night when I refuse a customer because she couldn't even walk to the car without being held up by 2 friends. When I refused one of her friend became very aggressive and throwing the verbal insults about and then tried to smash the door window at the back. Fortunately he did all this right in front of 2 police officers who very promptly dealt with him.
This was just after midnight. Is it any wonder that drivers here go home early.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 3:12 pm 
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grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

That is what we do. Even if we have a booking, if the passenger is, in the drivers opinion, to drunk to be carried safely, we refuse them. it is not the drivers job to clean up the puke that these people invariably leave behind.


To be fair, that is a policy I had too.

It's their own problem for being irresponsible with their own actions.

I suppose Uber could put a disclaimer in their app upon booking a fare that states "All riders with Uber reserve the right to refuse any customer should the rider deem them heavily intoxicated or violent upon pick-up".

Shouldn't be a difficult policy to implement.

It's at the driver's discretion then.

Perhaps a Judge may rule in the customer's favour in relation to contract law regarding taking a fare with someone who is heavily intoxicated.

It's possible the driver might be seen as irresponsible for taking the customer as they were not in control of their mental faculties.

But I don't think it would be a simple case unless they were witnesses involved.

There were witnesses involved last night when I refuse a customer because she couldn't even walk to the car without being held up by 2 friends. When I refused one of her friend became very aggressive and throwing the verbal insults about and then tried to smash the door window at the back. Fortunately he did all this right in front of 2 police officers who very promptly dealt with him.
This was just after midnight. Is it any wonder that drivers here go home early.


No wonder at all. Did it myself many times.

It is one of many reasons why I left the trade.

The amount of disrespect the public show towards drivers is quite something.

They all want something for nothing. Complain about high prices when there are anything but and complain and get aggressive when they can't get a cab or are refused to be taken.

It's what i like about doing food deliveries. No complaints and nobody giving me hassle inside the vehicle. Stress free.

I don't envy anyone who is still doing it. The driver shortage crisis will get worse in my opinion.

It's obvious to me.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 3:14 pm 
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Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
grandad wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

That is what we do. Even if we have a booking, if the passenger is, in the drivers opinion, to drunk to be carried safely, we refuse them. it is not the drivers job to clean up the puke that these people invariably leave behind.


To be fair, that is a policy I had too.

It's their own problem for being irresponsible with their own actions.

I suppose Uber could put a disclaimer in their app upon booking a fare that states "All riders with Uber reserve the right to refuse any customer should the rider deem them heavily intoxicated or violent upon pick-up".

Shouldn't be a difficult policy to implement.

It's at the driver's discretion then.

Perhaps a Judge may rule in the customer's favour in relation to contract law regarding taking a fare with someone who is heavily intoxicated.

It's possible the driver might be seen as irresponsible for taking the customer as they were not in control of their mental faculties.

But I don't think it would be a simple case unless they were witnesses involved.

There were witnesses involved last night when I refuse a customer because she couldn't even walk to the car without being held up by 2 friends. When I refused one of her friend became very aggressive and throwing the verbal insults about and then tried to smash the door window at the back. Fortunately he did all this right in front of 2 police officers who very promptly dealt with him.
This was just after midnight. Is it any wonder that drivers here go home early.


No wonder at all. Did it myself many times. Not worth staying out especially with the prices (there I go again). I never saw an incentive to stay out much past midnight generally for the sake of an extra £50 to £100. Life is too short.

It is one of many reasons why I left the trade.

The amount of disrespect the public show towards drivers is quite something.

They all want something for nothing. Complain about high prices when there are anything but and complain and get aggressive when they can't get a cab or are refused to be taken. A major gripe I had was when customers were always late arriving for their booking. 10 minutes, 15 minutes etc. We used to give the customer a 5 minute grace period from their time of booking and then started the meter. You would not believe the attitude from some when they got in the cab at the start and saw the price on the meter.

It's what I like about doing food deliveries. No complaints and nobody giving me hassle inside the vehicle. Stress free.

I don't envy anyone who is still in the taxi/cab industry. The driver shortage crisis will get worse in my opinion. The councils will do their best to exacerbate that problem.

It's obvious to me.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 6:51 pm 
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Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
How does Uber know if any of their customers are drunk or not when they book a cab via their app?

They don't. All customers whether they are drunk or not have to log in to the app and book their cab.

Uber have no way of knowing what condition any of their customers are in.

What are you suggesting they do to eradicate this?

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

I'm told Uber is a fit and proper operator, therefore they should have safeguards/policies in place.

I'm also told Uber drivers are fit and proper, so they can act like it rather than plead ignorance.

In fact I suspect Uber already has safeguards/policies in place and will refund the money, or the credit/debit card company will refund the money.

But the issue at hand is, is it legal to charge what you want, when you want, to whom you want, and I believe at times it is not.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 8:15 pm 
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Sussex wrote:
Rebel-Taxi-Driver wrote:
How does Uber know if any of their customers are drunk or not when they book a cab via their app?

They don't. All customers whether they are drunk or not have to log in to the app and book their cab.

Uber have no way of knowing what condition any of their customers are in.

What are you suggesting they do to eradicate this?

Are you suggesting they don't take the booking and leave the customer stranded without a ride?

I'm told Uber is a fit and proper operator, therefore they should have safeguards/policies in place.

I'm also told Uber drivers are fit and proper, so they can act like it rather than plead ignorance.

In fact I suspect Uber already has safeguards/policies in place and will refund the money, or the credit/debit card company will refund the money.

But the issue at hand is, is it legal to charge what you want, when you want, to whom you want, and I believe at times it is not.


In relation to legality specifically for HC it is not legal.

They are on a tariff set by the council.

However, each area has its own policies.

Where I worked you could name your price beforehand if the journey went out of my area of operation.

Therefore, assuming the customer agreed to it a verbal contract has been entered into.

I did this many times.

PH as I understand it can charge what they like legally as long as they inform the customer beforehand.


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